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What octane will Toyota GR corolla octane recommendation be?

  • 87

    Votes: 1 3.0%
  • 89

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 91

    Votes: 19 57.6%
  • 93

    Votes: 13 39.4%
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Hi guys (new to the forum),

So I wanted to get a GR86 but i live in CA and those *&^% don't have 93 octane at gas stations. I like to take care of my cars and do things the right way so out is the GR86...

My question is will the GR corolla need 93 octane as well as the GR86 or will it accept 87,89 or 91?

Thanks for the answer,
Cheers!
 

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You have a 3 cylinder engine that produces 100hp per cylinder. It would be blatantly negligent to run anything other than premium. (Some states that's 91).

I don't care what the owners manual might say. Any modern vehicle, especially turbocharged, needs premium.

Even N/a GDI engines have very high compression, typically

What you'll run into is the OEMs "dummy proofing" the timing and knock strategy to be able to run 87 at a reduced performance, for sake of saving the engine.

87 and 89 octane shouldnt exist anymore, in my opinion. We are beyond that fuel's limits in today's age.
 

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You're 100% entitled to your opinion, but this statement is objectively incorrect.
I suppose so, but itll be seriously crippled if run on regular. Were talking a turbo on top of compression that a couple decades ago would have been considered high compression for a NA engine!
It could be tuned to run on 87 but youd have to really pull timing.
Its like my friend and his M Coupe, the moment he reprogrammed his ecu to get rid of provisions for running on low octane gas, it got more power, but you better not run low octane or risk damage.
 

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You're 100% entitled to your opinion, but this statement is objectively incorrect.
Short of be filling up with 87 at sea level then driving to pike's peak. I'm very curious to hear your stance on the matter.


You do realize there are vehicles still on the road that were made at a time when 87 was premium.
Yeah. And for those few that are left you can twist that distributor to take advantage of today's fuels.
 

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Hi guys (new to the forum),

So I wanted to get a GR86 but i live in CA and those *&^% don't have 93 octane at gas stations. I like to take care of my cars and do things the right way so out is the GR86...

My question is will the GR corolla need 93 octane as well as the GR86 or will it accept 87,89 or 91?

Thanks for the answer,
Cheers!
GR Yaris takes our equivalent of 93, it'll need 93 or higher
 

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I suppose so, but itll be seriously crippled if run on regular. Were talking a turbo on top of compression that a couple decades ago would have been considered high compression for a NA engine!
It could be tuned to run on 87 but youd have to really pull timing.
Its like my friend and his M Coupe, the moment he reprogrammed his ecu to get rid of provisions for running on low octane gas, it got more power, but you better not run low octane or risk damage.
There are plenty of “regular” (aka not high performance) turbo small engines(1.5L-2.0L) on the market that are designed to use regular “low” octane fuel
 

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I'm getting the feeling that some of the folks who are interested in the GRC might never have had the opportunity to own/drive/maintain a very high performance vehicle before. (and thats great! congrats on the interest and eventual ownership! :) ). Ok, so here is what you need to understand -- in order to make such an incredibly high power number from such a small displacement (300 hp out of 1.6 liters is incredibly high for a production engine with full warranty etc), certain things need to happen. in this case it's turbocharged (no way in hell you could ever get that sort of power naturally aspirated, and still be able to street drive the car). and I have no idea what the max boost pressure is in order to get 300 hp and 276-295 lb-ft of torque out of 1.6 liters, but it is a LOT!!! my '18 Civic Type R is 2 liters, makes 306 hp (2 liters is 25% bigger engine than 1.6 liters) and my CTR max boost pressure is 23 psi stock. and the owners manual states Premium strongly recommended. i have never used anything other than 93 oct in my CTR because I don't want to ever have it detonate or preignite. (that is when the fuel air charge explodes in the engine before the spark plug tells it to. it is VERY destructive. in just a few seconds it can crack the pistons or break the ring lands and rings, and hammer the bearings and basically totally destroy your engine. very NOT good thing to happen!!!). so, I'm thinking in order to get that much power out of the 1.6, Toyota will need to have even higher boost; maybe even over 25-26 psi. that is so crazy high boost for a production engine to be running on normal pump gas (non racing gas). so what happens if you put in lower octane? like 87 or 89? well, the ecu will 'hear' detonation starting to happen as soon as you ask for hard acceleration, and it'll try to remediate the detonation (knocking its sometimes called). to remediate it, it'll pull as much boost out as it can. and likely retard the ignition as much as it can in order to stop the knock. great, you say! well, there is only a certain 'window' of adjustment that the ecu can operate in; it can only adjust so far in order to reduce the knocking. most likely if you put 87 in the GRC (or my CTR) and took it out and ran it hard flooring it often (even worse if its hot out and the intercooler isn't running as efficiently as it can in cool weather), the ecu would reach it's limit of adjusting for knock, and then engine damage would eventually result. and you might not even hear it as it's happening. just suddenly, blown up engine tons of smoke and clankety clank :( I've never put anything other than 93 in mine; but if I got stuck on a road trip and was out of gas and had only 87? sure i'd put in 5 gals and drive to the next gas station keeping it at under 10 psi boost (barely touching the gas pedal) til I could fill up with a full tank of 93 and be back on my happy way.

what I'm trying to say, is that this is a SPECIAL engine. this is like a motorsports derived race type engine. it will require special feeding and caring for it to keep it in good health over the long haul. it is NOT going to be like an everyday Corolla engine. it will require high octane fuel; it will require way more frequent oil changes with the best synthetic oil (as does my CTR; I change it every 3-4k miles with full synth). just wait till you guys see how often the transmission and transfer cases and differentials require fluid changes (probably with special expensive fluid too! my previous car was a EVO VIII and every 15k miles all of those needed changing with special fluids. some serious $ there). but it is all worth it cause this car will give you that special feeling that you can't get from a 'regular' car. just wanted to help here and explain and give some perspective.

PS this will not be a particularly great car on gas mileage either; even with that tiny 1.6 I think 30 mpg will be a stretch. there will be a lot of extra drag with that all wheel drive rally inspired drivetrain; lots of drag with all those locking diffs and the transfer case etc. I think more realistically it'll be 25 mpg, driving fairly normally. certainly no where near what a normal Corolla gets! so don't be buying this car for it's economy; it's not going to be terribly inexpensive to run and maintain every day. but boy oh boy do I think it'll be fun! if it's as much or more fun than my CTR? then we are in for a real treat!!! :)
 

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It's a performance oriented, high output, DI turbocharged engine.

91 will be the minimum. I'm sure it'll be possible to run it on 87, but chances are the car will be set to pull power and timing based on knock. Which means that you'll save $2 every time you fill up, but you'll lose power and torque and put more abuse on your engine over the long run.
 

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I suppose so, but itll be seriously crippled if run on regular.
Also objectively incorrect.

Short of be filling up with 87 at sea level then driving to pike's peak. I'm very curious to hear your stance on the matter.
My answer will be similar to this response:

There are plenty of “regular” (aka not high performance) turbo small engines(1.5L-2.0L) on the market that are designed to use regular “low” octane fuel
I'll talk about Honda's since they've been the only cars I've owned (until the GRC is released hopefully 😁). Look at Honda's current North American lineup—the Civic, CR-V, and Accord—probably their three best selling models—have been offered with turbocharged engines since at least 2018. All three are recommended to run on 87 octane fuel. Following some of the logic on here the millions of these cars that are on the road are all seriously crippled because their owners are putting 87 octane fuel in them as recommended by Honda.

Also—to be clear I'm talking about turbocharged engines in general—not the GRC/GRY engines specifically. I'm sure they will be/are tuned to run on 91+ octane.
 

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I'll talk about Honda's since they've been the only cars I've owned (until the GRC is released hopefully 😁). Look at Honda's current North American lineup—the Civic, CR-V, and Accord—probably their three best selling models—have been offered with turbocharged engines since at least 2018. All three are recommended to run on 87 octane fuel. Following some of the logic on here the millions of these cars that are on the road are all seriously crippled because their owners are putting 87 octane fuel in them as recommended by Honda.

Also—to be clear I'm talking about turbocharged engines in general—not the GRC/GRY engines specifically. I'm sure they will be/are tuned to run on 91+ octane.
Most performance oriented engines are designed to run on 91+ these days, even non turbo charged ones. The Gen 3 Coyote recommends 93, and it's an N/A V8.

Manufacturers can make turbocharged cars run on 87 by pulling timing and, therefore lowering power. When your goal is to make a performance-oriented car, you're not going to pull timing. You're going to assume whoever is buying the car will be willing to buy the gas, too.

There's a chance Toyota does something similar to Ford, where you can fill with either 87 or 93 and the car will learn based on knock timings. Even if they do, though, you're giving up power to save a minimal amount on gas, and you're putting more strain on the engine long term.
 

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I'm getting the feeling that some of the folks who are interested in the GRC might never have had the opportunity to own/drive/maintain a very high performance vehicle before. (and thats great! congrats on the interest and eventual ownership! :) ). Ok, so here is what you need to understand -- in order to make such an incredibly high power number from such a small displacement (300 hp out of 1.6 liters is incredibly high for a production engine with full warranty etc), certain things need to happen. in this case it's turbocharged (no way in hell you could ever get that sort of power naturally aspirated, and still be able to street drive the car). and I have no idea what the max boost pressure is in order to get 300 hp and 276-295 lb-ft of torque out of 1.6 liters, but it is a LOT!!! my '18 Civic Type R is 2 liters, makes 306 hp (2 liters is 25% bigger engine than 1.6 liters) and my CTR max boost pressure is 23 psi stock. and the owners manual states Premium strongly recommended. i have never used anything other than 93 oct in my CTR because I don't want to ever have it detonate or preignite. (that is when the fuel air charge explodes in the engine before the spark plug tells it to. it is VERY destructive. in just a few seconds it can crack the pistons or break the ring lands and rings, and hammer the bearings and basically totally destroy your engine. very NOT good thing to happen!!!). so, I'm thinking in order to get that much power out of the 1.6, Toyota will need to have even higher boost; maybe even over 25-26 psi. that is so crazy high boost for a production engine to be running on normal pump gas (non racing gas). so what happens if you put in lower octane? like 87 or 89? well, the ecu will 'hear' detonation starting to happen as soon as you ask for hard acceleration, and it'll try to remediate the detonation (knocking its sometimes called). to remediate it, it'll pull as much boost out as it can. and likely retard the ignition as much as it can in order to stop the knock. great, you say! well, there is only a certain 'window' of adjustment that the ecu can operate in; it can only adjust so far in order to reduce the knocking. most likely if you put 87 in the GRC (or my CTR) and took it out and ran it hard flooring it often (even worse if its hot out and the intercooler isn't running as efficiently as it can in cool weather), the ecu would reach it's limit of adjusting for knock, and then engine damage would eventually result. and you might not even hear it as it's happening. just suddenly, blown up engine tons of smoke and clankety clank :( I've never put anything other than 93 in mine; but if I got stuck on a road trip and was out of gas and had only 87? sure i'd put in 5 gals and drive to the next gas station keeping it at under 10 psi boost (barely touching the gas pedal) til I could fill up with a full tank of 93 and be back on my happy way.

what I'm trying to say, is that this is a SPECIAL engine. this is like a motorsports derived race type engine. it will require special feeding and caring for it to keep it in good health over the long haul. it is NOT going to be like an everyday Corolla engine. it will require high octane fuel; it will require way more frequent oil changes with the best synthetic oil (as does my CTR; I change it every 3-4k miles with full synth). just wait till you guys see how often the transmission and transfer cases and differentials require fluid changes (probably with special expensive fluid too! my previous car was a EVO VIII and every 15k miles all of those needed changing with special fluids. some serious $ there). but it is all worth it cause this car will give you that special feeling that you can't get from a 'regular' car. just wanted to help here and explain and give some perspective.

PS this will not be a particularly great car on gas mileage either; even with that tiny 1.6 I think 30 mpg will be a stretch. there will be a lot of extra drag with that all wheel drive rally inspired drivetrain; lots of drag with all those locking diffs and the transfer case etc. I think more realistically it'll be 25 mpg, driving fairly normally. certainly no where near what a normal Corolla gets! so don't be buying this car for it's economy; it's not going to be terribly inexpensive to run and maintain every day. but boy oh boy do I think it'll be fun! if it's as much or more fun than my CTR? then we are in for a real treat!!! :)
No need to be condescending. I think most people here understand that the GRC will require premium fuel. The issue is people seem to think that just because an engine is turbocharged, it will require premium fuel. This is isn't 1997 with turbo timers and what not.
 

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I'm getting the feeling that some of the folks who are interested in the GRC might never have had the opportunity to own/drive/maintain a very high performance vehicle before. (and thats great! congrats on the interest and eventual ownership! :) ). Ok, so here is what you need to understand -- in order to make such an incredibly high power number from such a small displacement (300 hp out of 1.6 liters is incredibly high for a production engine with full warranty etc), certain things need to happen. in this case it's turbocharged (no way in hell you could ever get that sort of power naturally aspirated, and still be able to street drive the car). and I have no idea what the max boost pressure is in order to get 300 hp and 276-295 lb-ft of torque out of 1.6 liters, but it is a LOT!!! my '18 Civic Type R is 2 liters, makes 306 hp (2 liters is 25% bigger engine than 1.6 liters) and my CTR max boost pressure is 23 psi stock. and the owners manual states Premium strongly recommended. i have never used anything other than 93 oct in my CTR because I don't want to ever have it detonate or preignite. (that is when the fuel air charge explodes in the engine before the spark plug tells it to. it is VERY destructive. in just a few seconds it can crack the pistons or break the ring lands and rings, and hammer the bearings and basically totally destroy your engine. very NOT good thing to happen!!!). so, I'm thinking in order to get that much power out of the 1.6, Toyota will need to have even higher boost; maybe even over 25-26 psi. that is so crazy high boost for a production engine to be running on normal pump gas (non racing gas). so what happens if you put in lower octane? like 87 or 89? well, the ecu will 'hear' detonation starting to happen as soon as you ask for hard acceleration, and it'll try to remediate the detonation (knocking its sometimes called). to remediate it, it'll pull as much boost out as it can. and likely retard the ignition as much as it can in order to stop the knock. great, you say! well, there is only a certain 'window' of adjustment that the ecu can operate in; it can only adjust so far in order to reduce the knocking. most likely if you put 87 in the GRC (or my CTR) and took it out and ran it hard flooring it often (even worse if its hot out and the intercooler isn't running as efficiently as it can in cool weather), the ecu would reach it's limit of adjusting for knock, and then engine damage would eventually result. and you might not even hear it as it's happening. just suddenly, blown up engine tons of smoke and clankety clank :( I've never put anything other than 93 in mine; but if I got stuck on a road trip and was out of gas and had only 87? sure i'd put in 5 gals and drive to the next gas station keeping it at under 10 psi boost (barely touching the gas pedal) til I could fill up with a full tank of 93 and be back on my happy way.

what I'm trying to say, is that this is a SPECIAL engine. this is like a motorsports derived race type engine. it will require special feeding and caring for it to keep it in good health over the long haul. it is NOT going to be like an everyday Corolla engine. it will require high octane fuel; it will require way more frequent oil changes with the best synthetic oil (as does my CTR; I change it every 3-4k miles with full synth). just wait till you guys see how often the transmission and transfer cases and differentials require fluid changes (probably with special expensive fluid too! my previous car was a EVO VIII and every 15k miles all of those needed changing with special fluids. some serious $ there). but it is all worth it cause this car will give you that special feeling that you can't get from a 'regular' car. just wanted to help here and explain and give some perspective.

PS this will not be a particularly great car on gas mileage either; even with that tiny 1.6 I think 30 mpg will be a stretch. there will be a lot of extra drag with that all wheel drive rally inspired drivetrain; lots of drag with all those locking diffs and the transfer case etc. I think more realistically it'll be 25 mpg, driving fairly normally. certainly no where near what a normal Corolla gets! so don't be buying this car for it's economy; it's not going to be terribly inexpensive to run and maintain every day. but boy oh boy do I think it'll be fun! if it's as much or more fun than my CTR? then we are in for a real treat!!! :)
GRY stock runs 20psi. GRC will probably run around 24-25psi or maybe less. If the GRY is anything to go by, they recommend replacing brake fluid, rear diff fluid, and transfer fluid at 25k miles or 24 months. They also reccommend oil every 6,200 miles or every 6 months. I'll be doing my oil every 5k though

Also objectively incorrect.



My answer will be similar to this response:



I'll talk about Honda's since they've been the only cars I've owned (until the GRC is released hopefully 😁). Look at Honda's current North American lineup—the Civic, CR-V, and Accord—probably their three best selling models—have been offered with turbocharged engines since at least 2018. All three are recommended to run on 87 octane fuel. Following some of the logic on here the millions of these cars that are on the road are all seriously crippled because their owners are putting 87 octane fuel in them as recommended by Honda.

Also—to be clear I'm talking about turbocharged engines in general—not the GRC/GRY engines specifically. I'm sure they will be/are tuned to run on 91+ octane.
GRY runs on 98RON minimum which is 93 octane. But yes, if Honda recommneds 87 for the turbo Civic, then it will be fine running on that. My uncle has a 19 Civic Si and they say 87 but he personally does 93 because that's what he wants. I believe what Taroroot was trying to say is that if the GRY/GRC is recommended 93, you probably can do 87 but it'd cripple the engine due to cutting back on timing
 

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Most performance oriented engines are designed to run on 91+ these days, even non turbo charged ones. The Gen 3 Coyote recommends 93, and it's an N/A V8.
Nobody (that I can tell) is arguing that performance engines are not designed to run on 91+. Please read the thread again. Some are saying that all turbocharged engines require 91+ which is factually incorrect.

Edit: Ya'll seriously need to work on reading comprehension.
 
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