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Haha excellent first post lol but I don’t have a paywall blocker unfortunately. Can’t you screen shot it? I’m not sure how long the article is but I’d love to read it
:D ... It's going to be a wall of text. The most exciting wall of text without a TLDR.

Courtesy of Daily Telegraph. This content is not written by me and I take no credit for the article or publication.

Toyota shocks with new GR Corolla
Toyota’s performance car department delivers driving thrills we’ve never experienced in a Corolla, thanks to a turbo engine and all-wheel-drive.



We’ve never seen a Toyota Corolla like this before.

The turbocharged GR Corolla wears the open-mouthed scowl of a boxer between rounds, hungrily taking in air while waiting for another opportunity to lay the competition on the canvas.



Our first test of this long-awaited hot hatch takes place at the Utah Motorsports Campus in the United States, where it’s 100 degrees in the shade.
Rival machines might throw in the towel when facing the proposition of back-to-back summer hot laps at the hands of eager media but there’s fighting spirit in this Corolla.



Distant mountains shimmer as the heat pours from vents on the bonnet while we strap in for another round.
The Corolla feels more accommodating than its smaller GR Yaris sibling, with a lower seating position, higher roof and vastly improved driver visibility.
The five-door body shell and usable rear seat make it a far more liveable proposition.



Familiar at first, the GR Corolla’s cabin has a compact new steering wheel, sports seats and a customisable digital dashboard.
A manual gearlever feels out of place in a car usually associated with hybrid power, as does a dial adjusting the front-to-rear power bias of its all-wheel-drive system.
The muscular body has structural bracing and hundreds of additional weld points to improve rigidity.
Flared wheel arches, enormous brakes, a carbon fibre roof and triple exhausts add to its attitude.



The 1.6-litre turbocharged triple clears its throat with gusto before setting into a raspy idle.
High altitude and record temperatures take the sting out of its 221kW and 370Nm, making a claimed sub-five-second sprint to 100km/h feel optimistic.
The first two corners after pit exit are named “Fast” and “Faster” – flat-out fourth-gear right-handers – before a brush of the brakes and blip back to third for a left-right “Gotcha” and “Maybe y’all makit” sequence taken at above highway speeds.



As with the best hot hatches, the Corolla encourages drivers to turn the car using the brake pedal, shifting weight onto the nose to unload a rear end that arcs across the track while the front end remains planted.
There’s no slack in the Corolla’s controls as meaty steering responds crisply to driver inputs, joining firm suspension with a moderate degree of body roll to telegraph how hard the tyres are working.



The brake pedal feels just right, with confidence-inspiring weight and unfiltered feel. It might seem too high for heel-and-toe shifting on the street but the brake is perfectly positioned for rev-matching during big stops on track.
Four-wheel-drive and a touch of turbo lag invite hard and early throttle applications, combining purchase and power to slingshot away from every bend.
Great performance cars give their drivers options when pushing on.



You can pilot the Corolla tidily or indulge in sideways flair, especially when the Michelins have been seared by a scalding surface.
There was zero deterioration in braking performance over the course of a full day’s trackwork that cooked the brakes on Toyota Supra coupes. This is a car designed for enthusiasts who will push their car to the limit.
The track-day crowd will applaud 18-inch wheels that allow access to a broader (and cheaper) selection of ultra-high performance rubber than 19-inch or 20-inch hoops. Gymkhana regulars will love a handbrake that automatically disconnects drive to the rear axle.



Amateur racers will be drawn to a special-edition “Morizo” model that deletes the back seat, rear windscreen wiper, window motors, speakers and parcel shelf in a frenzied commitment to reduce its fighting weight. It also has forged wheels, track-spec tyres, stiffer suspension and a slightly punchier engine tune to take the fight to hot-hatch rivals.
This is more than just a fast car.



It’s a thrilling driver’s tool that promises unforgettable experiences for those lucky enough to get hold of one.
We don’t know how much the car will cost in Australia, or exactly what equipment will be included in the first 500 examples due to arrive early next year, but Toyota did not pull its punches when developing the GR Corolla.
It promises to become the new champion of the hot-hatch division if Toyota can get the price right.



TOYOTA GR COROLLA
PRICE
Not available yet, but more than $50,000 (AUD)
ENGINE 1.6-litre 3-cyl turbo, 221kW and 370Nm
SAFETY Seven airbags, auto emergency braking, active cruise control, lane-keeping assistance, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert
THIRST 9.8 litres per 100km
SPARE Repair kit
 

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High altitude and record temperatures take the sting out of its 221kW and 370Nm, making a claimed sub-five-second sprint to 100km/h feel optimistic.
Lmao I can't believe somebody already broke embargo. Thank you for pasting the article here! Seems like the car is pretty much what we hoped it would be, although I am slightly skeptical of the overwhelmingly positive tone. But we will get truly objective content come Wednesday thanks to Throttle House, Jason Cammisa, Savagegeese etc.
 

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Lmao I can't believe somebody already broke embargo. Thank you for pasting the article here! Seems like the car is pretty much what we hoped it would be, although I am slightly skeptical of the overwhelmingly positive tone. But we will get truly objective content come Wednesday thanks to Throttle House, Jason Cammisa, Savagegeese etc.
Agreed. Bring on the reviews!
 

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G'day! Long time lurker, first time poster.

This could be the first early review on the GR Corolla. You will need a PayWall blocker to view it (sorry in advance if advising that is against forum rules).

Yeah I saw that and almost signed up just to read that article but I ain't paying for news lol.
 

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:D ... It's going to be a wall of text. The most exciting wall of text without a TLDR.

Toyota shocks with new GR Corolla
Toyota’s performance car department delivers driving thrills we’ve never experienced in a Corolla, thanks to a turbo engine and all-wheel-drive.



We’ve never seen a Toyota Corolla like this before.

The turbocharged GR Corolla wears the open-mouthed scowl of a boxer between rounds, hungrily taking in air while waiting for another opportunity to lay the competition on the canvas.



Our first test of this long-awaited hot hatch takes place at the Utah Motorsports Campus in the United States, where it’s 100 degrees in the shade.
Rival machines might throw in the towel when facing the proposition of back-to-back summer hot laps at the hands of eager media but there’s fighting spirit in this Corolla.



Distant mountains shimmer as the heat pours from vents on the bonnet while we strap in for another round.
The Corolla feels more accommodating than its smaller GR Yaris sibling, with a lower seating position, higher roof and vastly improved driver visibility.
The five-door body shell and usable rear seat make it a far more liveable proposition.



Familiar at first, the GR Corolla’s cabin has a compact new steering wheel, sports seats and a customisable digital dashboard.
A manual gearlever feels out of place in a car usually associated with hybrid power, as does a dial adjusting the front-to-rear power bias of its all-wheel-drive system.
The muscular body has structural bracing and hundreds of additional weld points to improve rigidity.
Flared wheel arches, enormous brakes, a carbon fibre roof and triple exhausts add to its attitude.



The 1.6-litre turbocharged triple clears its throat with gusto before setting into a raspy idle.
High altitude and record temperatures take the sting out of its 221kW and 370Nm, making a claimed sub-five-second sprint to 100km/h feel optimistic.
The first two corners after pit exit are named “Fast” and “Faster” – flat-out fourth-gear right-handers – before a brush of the brakes and blip back to third for a left-right “Gotcha” and “Maybe y’all makit” sequence taken at above highway speeds.



As with the best hot hatches, the Corolla encourages drivers to turn the car using the brake pedal, shifting weight onto the nose to unload a rear end that arcs across the track while the front end remains planted.
There’s no slack in the Corolla’s controls as meaty steering responds crisply to driver inputs, joining firm suspension with a moderate degree of body roll to telegraph how hard the tyres are working.



The brake pedal feels just right, with confidence-inspiring weight and unfiltered feel. It might seem too high for heel-and-toe shifting on the street but the brake is perfectly positioned for rev-matching during big stops on track.
Four-wheel-drive and a touch of turbo lag invite hard and early throttle applications, combining purchase and power to slingshot away from every bend.
Great performance cars give their drivers options when pushing on.



You can pilot the Corolla tidily or indulge in sideways flair, especially when the Michelins have been seared by a scalding surface.
There was zero deterioration in braking performance over the course of a full day’s trackwork that cooked the brakes on Toyota Supra coupes. This is a car designed for enthusiasts who will push their car to the limit.
The track-day crowd will applaud 18-inch wheels that allow access to a broader (and cheaper) selection of ultra-high performance rubber than 19-inch or 20-inch hoops. Gymkhana regulars will love a handbrake that automatically disconnects drive to the rear axle.



Amateur racers will be drawn to a special-edition “Morizo” model that deletes the back seat, rear windscreen wiper, window motors, speakers and parcel shelf in a frenzied commitment to reduce its fighting weight. It also has forged wheels, track-spec tyres, stiffer suspension and a slightly punchier engine tune to take the fight to hot-hatch rivals.
This is more than just a fast car.



It’s a thrilling driver’s tool that promises unforgettable experiences for those lucky enough to get hold of one.
We don’t know how much the car will cost in Australia, or exactly what equipment will be included in the first 500 examples due to arrive early next year, but Toyota did not pull its punches when developing the GR Corolla.
It promises to become the new champion of the hot-hatch division if Toyota can get the price right.



TOYOTA GR COROLLA
PRICE
Not available yet, but more than $50,000 (AUD)
ENGINE 1.6-litre 3-cyl turbo, 221kW and 370Nm
SAFETY Seven airbags, auto emergency braking, active cruise control, lane-keeping assistance, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert
THIRST 9.8 litres per 100km
SPARE Repair kit
Lmao it appears it’s been pulled down already! 😂 it’s a good thing you screen shot it hahahaha
 

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It doesn't matter if I'm biased or not, just look up the other YouTube reviews that pick the Supra over the Z. The whole "but it feels better" nonsense doesn't fly. The Z is heavier, with cheaper components built on a 20 year old platform. That will never add up to a better car, in any way, in any fairytale.
The engine IS great, but just because you drove a BMW, doesn't mean you know how a Supra drives. Even the Z4 which is it's sister car, "feels" different. Toyota tuned the suspension so that's why it's different.
SavageGeese is a joke, a biased one at that, and the guys in his own video didn't even agree with him :ROFLMAO: the difference is, I'm not a YouTuber making car reviews. So I'd expect some journalistic integrity from guys like him. But that went right out the window with comments like, "that BMW shit that I loathe". He decided the Z was better before he stepped foot in either car. Luckily we have other reviewers, and facts like dynos and lap timers to tell us the truth.
LOL. Whatever you say dude. I'm sure the Toyota difference makes the Supra so much better than every other BMW.
No matter how big wall of text you write, I'm still going to say bmws aren't drivers cars. Everyone has their definition of what that means. At least they haven't been for a while now. Bmws are fast, but in no way will they make me feel connected. Doesn't matter if it's a m240i, M340i, or a Supra.

I'm with you man. I have a loaded 2018 340i with track pack. It has down pipe, intake, hpfp, e40 tune, tcu tune, wheels and tires, and some other stuff. For all intents and purposes it's a fantastic and fast car, but holy shit is it boring and disconnected. That's why I'm gonna just switch to the GR to have a fun daily and focus any hardcore mods onto my S2K.
Yep. And you're talking about the last gen too. The newest one feels even less connected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #195 ·
The article's main take away is that the car has great brakes and is slightly tail happy on braking. Turbo lag is not unexpected for such small engine with a turbo. Does not launch off the line as hard as numbers may seem. It does not give much more than that info.
 

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Facts like dynos and lap timers to tell us the truth.
Okay, then why aren't you in a Tesla 3 Performance or S Plaid?

Numbers don't tell you about how a car feels or makes you feel. I drove a 3.0 Supra and I hated it. And I took my 4AT RX-8 to the test drive. By the time I returned the Supra, I couldn't wait to get back into my RX-8, crap gearbox and all. The Supra feels like a sterile, claustrophobic instrument designed to play a numbers game. If that floats your boat, great! Enjoy your A91.
 

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:D ... It's going to be a wall of text. The most exciting wall of text without a TLDR.

Courtesy of Daily Telegraph. This content is not written by me and I take no credit for the article or publication.

Toyota shocks with new GR Corolla
Toyota’s performance car department delivers driving thrills we’ve never experienced in a Corolla, thanks to a turbo engine and all-wheel-drive.



We’ve never seen a Toyota Corolla like this before.

The turbocharged GR Corolla wears the open-mouthed scowl of a boxer between rounds, hungrily taking in air while waiting for another opportunity to lay the competition on the canvas.



Our first test of this long-awaited hot hatch takes place at the Utah Motorsports Campus in the United States, where it’s 100 degrees in the shade.
Rival machines might throw in the towel when facing the proposition of back-to-back summer hot laps at the hands of eager media but there’s fighting spirit in this Corolla.



Distant mountains shimmer as the heat pours from vents on the bonnet while we strap in for another round.
The Corolla feels more accommodating than its smaller GR Yaris sibling, with a lower seating position, higher roof and vastly improved driver visibility.
The five-door body shell and usable rear seat make it a far more liveable proposition.



Familiar at first, the GR Corolla’s cabin has a compact new steering wheel, sports seats and a customisable digital dashboard.
A manual gearlever feels out of place in a car usually associated with hybrid power, as does a dial adjusting the front-to-rear power bias of its all-wheel-drive system.
The muscular body has structural bracing and hundreds of additional weld points to improve rigidity.
Flared wheel arches, enormous brakes, a carbon fibre roof and triple exhausts add to its attitude.



The 1.6-litre turbocharged triple clears its throat with gusto before setting into a raspy idle.
High altitude and record temperatures take the sting out of its 221kW and 370Nm, making a claimed sub-five-second sprint to 100km/h feel optimistic.
The first two corners after pit exit are named “Fast” and “Faster” – flat-out fourth-gear right-handers – before a brush of the brakes and blip back to third for a left-right “Gotcha” and “Maybe y’all makit” sequence taken at above highway speeds.



As with the best hot hatches, the Corolla encourages drivers to turn the car using the brake pedal, shifting weight onto the nose to unload a rear end that arcs across the track while the front end remains planted.
There’s no slack in the Corolla’s controls as meaty steering responds crisply to driver inputs, joining firm suspension with a moderate degree of body roll to telegraph how hard the tyres are working.



The brake pedal feels just right, with confidence-inspiring weight and unfiltered feel. It might seem too high for heel-and-toe shifting on the street but the brake is perfectly positioned for rev-matching during big stops on track.
Four-wheel-drive and a touch of turbo lag invite hard and early throttle applications, combining purchase and power to slingshot away from every bend.
Great performance cars give their drivers options when pushing on.



You can pilot the Corolla tidily or indulge in sideways flair, especially when the Michelins have been seared by a scalding surface.
There was zero deterioration in braking performance over the course of a full day’s trackwork that cooked the brakes on Toyota Supra coupes. This is a car designed for enthusiasts who will push their car to the limit.
The track-day crowd will applaud 18-inch wheels that allow access to a broader (and cheaper) selection of ultra-high performance rubber than 19-inch or 20-inch hoops. Gymkhana regulars will love a handbrake that automatically disconnects drive to the rear axle.



Amateur racers will be drawn to a special-edition “Morizo” model that deletes the back seat, rear windscreen wiper, window motors, speakers and parcel shelf in a frenzied commitment to reduce its fighting weight. It also has forged wheels, track-spec tyres, stiffer suspension and a slightly punchier engine tune to take the fight to hot-hatch rivals.
This is more than just a fast car.



It’s a thrilling driver’s tool that promises unforgettable experiences for those lucky enough to get hold of one.
We don’t know how much the car will cost in Australia, or exactly what equipment will be included in the first 500 examples due to arrive early next year, but Toyota did not pull its punches when developing the GR Corolla.
It promises to become the new champion of the hot-hatch division if Toyota can get the price right.



TOYOTA GR COROLLA
PRICE
Not available yet, but more than $50,000 (AUD)
ENGINE 1.6-litre 3-cyl turbo, 221kW and 370Nm
SAFETY Seven airbags, auto emergency braking, active cruise control, lane-keeping assistance, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert
THIRST 9.8 litres per 100km
SPARE Repair kit
Thank you for sharing! Terms like “meaty steering” and “driving tool” suggest this is going to be a very promising car to drive. Looking forward to the rest of the reviews tomorrow.
 

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Okay, then why aren't you in a Tesla 3 Performance or S Plaid?

Numbers don't tell you about how a car feels or makes you feel. I drove a 3.0 Supra and I hated it. And I took my 4AT RX-8 to the test drive. By the time I returned Supra, I couldn't wait to get back into my RX-8, crap gearbox and all. The Supra feels like a sterile, claustrophobic instrument designed to play a numbers game. If that floats your boat, great! Enjoy your A91.
Exactly how I felt returning from the bmw dealership in my 20 year old miata.
 

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Exactly how I felt returning from the bmw dealership in my 20 year old miata.
Well it can be worse try the 32 year old MR2 Turbo, I always knew there was a risk of selling it and being disappointed in anything new.

I think you have to accept that the feeling has changed in a modern car, it lacks a bit of that "Rawness" and it can feel a bit sterile because of the precision driving, maybe it doesn't feel as fast or as on the edge but I'm afraid the laptimes will tell a different story.

What I suspect will happen is you just get used to the newer car, find the new limits and if you then jumped back into something old you would find that all its doing is trying to kill you on the track. Pretty much anything is okay on the road but when you track it the limits become obvious really quickly.
 
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