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i'm assuming because both are intended to exhaust engine bay heat. since circuit has them on the hood, they don't need to be there in the fender...?

but what's wrong with having more heat exiting...unless it's creating weird wind turbulance
It’s because of the wing, the air going through some of the duct work lifted the front end up or something along those lines per an engineer.

it was talked about on here during the measuring session. That’s why the Core and Morizo doesn’t have their ducts blocked off.
 

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It’s because of the wing, the air going through some of the duct work lifted the front end up or something along those lines per an engineer.

it was talked about on here during the measuring session. That’s why the Core and Morizo doesn’t have their ducts blocked off.
so should people be blocking those ducts all the same when they put a big wing on?
 

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I guess if it creates too much lift. I’m curious if the Super Taikyu car has the same issue or even the Japanese spec cars.
Those are purpose built/setup cars. They probably never reach high mphs, which is where the front end can probably become unstable. If the GR Corolla can hit 150mph, it needs to do it safely, performance at low mph be dammed.
 

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Road and Track Performance Car of the Year (featuring Morizo Edition GRC)

The Morizo gives a good showing on the track here and gets good marks from the staff. It's 6 tenths off the CTR (both with Cup 2s) which is about what I expected, but will disappoint some people who were hoping the Morizo would run right with it.
Not sure if I agree with the good showing. With Cup2's and all the Morizo changes to increase performance it's .8 seconds or less than .9% faster than the Elantra N. Half that difference, if not more, is simply the tires. Core/Circuit on PS4's are likely as fast or slower than the Elantra N on that course. Of course the difference is easier to swallow comparing against the Core/Circuit than the Morizo price wise but not sure if that's what GR Corolla owners were shooting for. Think most people believe the GR Corolla core/circuit is less of a track car than the CTR but don't think many expected it to be on par with the Elantra N. The gaps between the tiers are kind of surprising but at the same time not, the RS3 gapped the 4 cylinders then M4CSL gapped the RS3... the track layout appears to favor power with 4 extended power sections per lap just didn't expect a 4 second gap between the CTR (if we downgrade to the stock PS4S) and RS3 then a little less surprising another 4+ second gap to the M4 CSL.
 

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There's certainly a lot of possible factors that could make that difference which are very difficult to control too:

  • Time of day
  • Track surface temperature changes
  • Air temperature changes
  • Tire temperature at start of lap
  • Treadwear
  • Fuel level
  • Driver skill (if different drivers)
  • Driver mood/fatigue
  • How rubbered in the track is
  • Number of attempts

I kart a lot and even driving the same kart on the same track with the same driver on the same day can be quite different session to session.

Certainly it's very hard for anyone to get very scientific data. So I always keep that in mind when I see these lap comparisons. Some data is better than no data though.
 

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There's certainly a lot of possible factors that could make that difference which are very difficult to control too:

  • Time of day
  • Track surface temperature changes
  • Air temperature changes
  • Tire temperature at start of lap
  • Treadwear
  • Fuel level
  • Driver skill (if different drivers)
  • Driver mood/fatigue
  • How rubbered in the track is
  • Number of attempts

I kart a lot and even driving the same kart on the same track with the same driver on the same day can be quite different session to session.

Certainly it's very hard for anyone to get very scientific data. So I always keep that in mind when I see these lap comparisons. Some data is better than no data though.
I'd presume all the various manufacturers provided brand new tires and brake pads at the least for all the cars before they handed them over.
 

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There's certainly a lot of possible factors that could make that difference which are very difficult to control too:

  • Time of day
  • Track surface temperature changes
  • Air temperature changes
  • Tire temperature at start of lap
  • Treadwear
  • Fuel level
  • Driver skill (if different drivers)
  • Driver mood/fatigue
  • How rubbered in the track is
  • Number of attempts

I kart a lot and even driving the same kart on the same track with the same driver on the same day can be quite different session to session.

Certainly it's very hard for anyone to get very scientific data. So I always keep that in mind when I see these lap comparisons. Some data is better than no data though.
Keep in mind for all these tests the cars are constantly on track. Allowed time to cool, possibly swap out the tires/brake pads (if the OEM provides, sometimes they dont), and back out on the track. There's a constant rotation with multiple cars on the track. Is this going to make the most ideal 'hero' lap? No. But is that really what the article is about? As most of these aren't professional drivers but maybe grassroots backgrounds but now are journalists. So being this nitpicky about the times, and the differences between car times aren't even all that close anyway, is somewhat pointless. It's about a given group of above average drivers hustling the car to the limit of their ability and stock of tires/brakes and getting the best time the group can muster. Thing is on a whole most cars that MotorTrend does this with for the CoTY tests don't survive 2-3 laps because of stock brake fade and they have to pull off for cool down period so no one really has even 5 back to back laps to learn the quirks of the car and how best to attack the off camber jumps, compressions or whatever the track has.
 

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Keep in mind for all these tests the cars are constantly on track. Allowed time to cool, possibly swap out the tires/brake pads (if the OEM provides, sometimes they dont), and back out on the track. There's a constant rotation with multiple cars on the track. Is this going to make the most ideal 'hero' lap? No. But is that really what the article is about? As most of these aren't professional drivers but maybe grassroots backgrounds but now are journalists. So being this nitpicky about the times, and the differences between car times aren't even all that close anyway, is somewhat pointless. It's about a given group of above average drivers hustling the car to the limit of their ability and stock of tires/brakes and getting the best time the group can muster. Thing is on a whole most cars that MotorTrend does this with for the CoTY tests don't survive 2-3 laps because of stock brake fade and they have to pull off for cool down period so no one really has even 5 back to back laps to learn the quirks of the car and how best to attack the off camber jumps, compressions or whatever the track has.
I also wonder if the track is favorable to the car with most power.
 

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Of course the track is favorable to the car with the most power (unless the track is very tight and twisty and almost auto-crossy. Throttle Houses track is super tight in this regard). Most ‘real’ tracks (I’m a race driver and mostly race on the east coast with SCCA and NASA and VRG, at tracks like Watkins Glen, VIR, Summit Point, Lime Rock, NJMP, Road Atlanta, Mid Ohio, Pocono, Sebring etc). Tracks that have longer straights and more higher speed turns will of course favor more engine power (and more aero downforce). It’s always been like that. Look at how the Z06/Z07 absolutely crushed the other cars in that completion (I couldn’t believe how bad it crushed the GT4RS!!!!).

the best the GRC had to offer was used (the Morizo) and the FL5 was faster. That’s (to me) no surprise. On the bigger faster ‘real’ racetracks the CTR is gonna out do the GRC. especially the Core and Circuit, which are heavier with lower engine tune and taller gears and softer suspensions. It’s just physics.

where the GRCs will have a better chance will be tight twisty small tracks and autox with lots of 2nd gear sharp turns and less straights. This is where having awd will be a plus instead of a hindrance and I bet the GRC will post much more competitive times.

(PS also if it’s raining (no matter what the course size) the awd will be a monster advantage and the GRC will shine (no matter if it’s a Core or CE or ME).
 

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Of course the track is favorable to the car with the most power (unless the track is very tight and twisty and almost auto-crossy. Throttle Houses track is super tight in this regard). Most ‘real’ tracks (I’m a race driver and mostly race on the east coast with SCCA and NASA and VRG, at tracks like Watkins Glen, VIR, Summit Point, Lime Rock, NJMP, Road Atlanta, Mid Ohio, Pocono, Sebring etc). Tracks that have longer straights and more higher speed turns will of course favor more engine power (and more aero downforce). It’s always been like that. Look at how the Z06/Z07 absolutely crushed the other cars in that completion (I couldn’t believe how bad it crushed the GT4RS!!!!).

the best the GRC had to offer was used (the Morizo) and the FL5 was faster. That’s (to me) no surprise. On the bigger faster ‘real’ racetracks the CTR is gonna out do the GRC. especially the Core and Circuit, which are heavier with lower engine tune and taller gears and softer suspensions. It’s just physics.

where the GRCs will have a better chance will be tight twisty small tracks and autox with lots of 2nd gear sharp turns and less straights. This is where having awd will be a plus instead of a hindrance and I bet the GRC will post much more competitive times.

(PS also if it’s raining (no matter what the course size) the awd will be a monster advantage and the GRC will shine (no matter if it’s a Core or CE or ME).
My favorite metric for a car's handling is the tsukuba lap time and sector times. Very tight and short, not sure what other track is like this in the US side but i'd love to know!
 

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Motor Trend also had their performance car shootout:

Interestingly they said they did NOT get the Morizo because Toyota didn't feel it was eligible, not being available yet. IDK why the difference between magazines. Why [Insert Random Car] Wasn’t at Performance Vehicle of the Year

It seems with all the reviews the CTR is faster and has a nicer interior, the GRC has AWD and a special engine, and the Elantra N is a performance bargain, so take your pick.

(The GRC does seem to be the most everyday livable in some ways though; its suspension, while softer, is reported not to cause pogoing like in the new CTR and the Elantra N.)
 
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