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Nope. I live in a snow state and want 4 wheels driving, instead of 2. My wife’s Subaru is setup for 3 wheels driving and is fun and impressive in the snow.
Also I plan to track it a bit.

If you live in the south and won’t track/hoon it, really no needs for the diffs. They only help if you spin the wheels.
 

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Nope. I live in a snow state and want 4 wheels driving, instead of 2. My wife’s Subaru is setup for 3 wheels driving and is fun and impressive in the snow.
Also I plan to track it a bit.

If you live in the south and won’t track/hoon it, really no needs for the diffs. They only help if you spin the wheels.
its AWD regardless of performance package.
 

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What? Its still AWD regardless of having the LSD. You still have the ability to change how much power goes between the front and back tires without the performance package.
It’s just how spider gears work man. Unless the traction load is 100% equal, one tire is getting most of the power unless there is a traction device (LSD/locker) to equalize it. Like I said, 1 tire in the front is getting powered and one in the rear is. It’s the physical limitations of an open differential.
 

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What? Its still AWD regardless of having the LSD. You still have the ability to change how much power goes between the front and back tires without the performance package.
Cars always send power to the wheels with the least resistance. If you're slipping with an AWD/4WD car without LSD's, you essentially have 1 front wheel and 1 rear wheel. It's why in RWD without an LSD you'll have a one wheel peel when trying to do a burnout and why you'll see offroaders have locking diffs sending equal power to each wheel when needed. If you're flexing on a trail with 2 wheels in the air, the 50% rear power is going to the wheel in the air and the 50% front power is going to the front wheel in the air so 100% of your power is useless
 

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It’s also why there are all of those compilation videos of Mustang GTs yeeting themselves off the road…obviously traction will be better overall in an all wheel drive car but SENDING IT through an open diff is not a recipe for putting power down cleanly, as it leads to what Wynorrific is talking about. I’m sure the GRC without the diffs is still going to be a hoot but if you’re planning on doing any serious performance driving you’re going to want the differentials.

Frankly I’m a little puzzled as to why they aren’t standard in the first place, unless not equipping them helps Toyota get the barebones core under a magical price.
 

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It’s just how spider gears work man. Unless the traction load is 100% equal, one tire is getting most of the power unless there is a traction device (LSD/locker) to equalize it. Like I said, 1 tire in the front is getting powered and one in the rear is. It’s the physical limitations of an open differential.
I get that, but what im asking/saying is even without LSD its still AWD? Like a FWD car still doesn't have the same ability to put power to rear tires? If thats not the case there should be no reason this car is anymore than 34k without the performance package.
Cars always send power to the wheels with the least resistance. If you're slipping with an AWD/4WD car without LSD's, you essentially have 1 front wheel and 1 rear wheel. It's why in RWD without an LSD you'll have a one wheel peel when trying to do a burnout and why you'll see offroaders have locking diffs sending equal power to each wheel when needed. If you're flexing on a trail with 2 wheels in the air, the 50% rear power is going to the wheel in the air and the 50% front power is going to the front wheel in the air so 100% of your power is useless
Ok so in reality the performance package is needed if you want to get tge most out of this car. But assuming you aren't going to the track maybe its not.
 

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I get that, but what im asking/saying is even without LSD its still AWD? Like a FWD car still doesn't have the same ability to put power to rear tires? If thats not the case there should be no reason this car is anymore than 34k without the performance package.
Are you reading Yoter and Wynorrific’s reponses to your confusion? The car is AWD still, yes. But when there’s a loss of grip an open differential will send power to the side w/o grip. So imagine you’re driving in the snow, one wheel will be spinning up front and one wheel spinning in back, hence saying its actually 2WD.

An open diff’s shortcomings arent limited to track work. Put simply, the only time there would be no difference between open and LSD is when you’re going straight.
 

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Are you reading Yoter and Wynorrific’s reponses to your confusion? The car is AWD still, yes. But when there’s a loss of grip an open differential will send power to the side w/o grip. So imagine you’re driving in the snow, one wheel will be spinning up front and one wheel spinning in back, hence saying its actually 2WD.
Ok, thats helps with the confusion. So basically saying you probably want the performance package regardless of what you do, otherwise you may as well go with another car. But either way if this car doesn't come with LSD its really on par with a Veloster N and Type R.
 

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It’s also why there are all of those compilation videos of Mustang GTs yeeting themselves off the road…obviously traction will be better overall in an all wheel drive car but SENDING IT through an open diff is not a recipe for putting power down cleanly, as it leads to what Wynorrific is talking about. I’m sure the GRC without the diffs is still going to be a hoot but if you’re planning on doing any serious performance driving you’re going to want the differentials.

Frankly I’m a little puzzled as to why they aren’t standard in the first place, unless not equipping them helps Toyota get the barebones core under a magical price.
I believe it's for the price. @Jeonsa and I have said many times that most Cores are probably going to be bought with the PP and that the Core with PP is a true rival to the Type R since it has an LSD and the STi had LSD's. Core will be moreso a competitor to the WRX since it has open diffs as well
 

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Ok, thats helps with the confusion. So basically saying you probably want the performance package regardless of what you do, otherwise you may as well go with another car. But either way if this car doesn't come with LSD its really on par with a Veloster N and Type R.
Personally yea, I wouldn’t buy unless it had performance pack. But some people don’t mind having opens because they don’t plan on pushing the car much. Plus you always have the option of adding LSDs in the future. You even have the option of upgrading to a mechanical LSD, which is better than the performance pack’s torsen LSD for track work.

I appreciate that Toyota is giving us options.
 

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I get that, but what im asking/saying is even without LSD its still AWD? Like a FWD car still doesn't have the same ability to put power to rear tires? If thats not the case there should be no reason this car is anymore than 34k without the performance package.

Ok so in reality the performance package is needed if you want to get tge most out of this car. But assuming you aren't going to the track maybe its not.
@007 said it in another thread but Torsen LSD's are actually less preferred on track due to them having less of a "lock-up" effect. He also had this to say about the types of LSD's:

There's a big disconnect between how folks on this forum perceive differentials and how Toyota views them. It boils down to the term "mechanical" being incorrectly applied. Let me explain.

Toyota's Torsen LSD in the GRY and GRC is not a Mechanical Clutch LSD. Some sites incorrectly refer to Torsen as being a "mechanical" LSD, which is misleading because mechanical typically refers to Mechanical Clutch LSD. A torque-sensing LSD doesn't have clutches. It uses a "mechanical system", but it is not a Mechanical Clutch LSD. This is where many get confused.

Car manufacturers typically refer to "Mechanical Clutch LSD" as simply "mechanical". That's exactly how Toyota differentiates the LSD's on its models. They advertise the standard GR Yaris as having a "Torsen LSD" and the GR Yaris GRMN having a "mechanical LSD". The latter of which requires more maintenance, is louder, but also better suited for track use.
In reality, the PP really varies what you want to do with the car. I'm getting it as I want to start out in Rallycross in the stock class which means the package LSD's are a big thing for me since adding an aftermarket LSD means moving to the prepared class. The LSD's will be huge for people that get snow but you can always upgrade it. Like NA6 said, it's nice we have the options
 

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I believe it's for the price. @Jeonsa and I have said many times that most Cores are probably going to be bought with the PP and that the Core with PP is a true rival to the Type R since it has an LSD and the STi had LSD's. Core will be moreso a competitor to the WRX since it has open diffs as well
With Everything that has been said, yeah the PP is a must. Thank you for the explanation.
 
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